Jane's All the World's Aircraft is an aviation annual publication founded by John Frederick Thomas Jane in 1909. Long issued by Sampson Low, Marston in Britain (with various publishers in the U.S.), it has been published by Janes Group since 1989/90.
The first volume's title referred to "airships" while all since have referenced "aircraft". After World War I, the format of the book shifted from an oblong ("landscape") format to the present "portrait" orientation. With the 1993/94 edition, the book was divided into two volumes that continue to appear annually. The main volume focuses on aircraft in production while the second book describes older aircraft and upgrades, both military and civil. While 2009 was the centennial year of Jane's All the World's Aircraft, 2013 marked the 100th edition — the disparity due to disruptions (chiefly with volumes covering two years) during the two World Wars. Starting in 1969, Arco (New York) issued the following six volumes in facsimile editions: 1909, 1913, 1919, 1938, 1944-45, and 1950-51.
The author of this website digitizes materials from Jane's All the World's Aircraft yearbooks. Fixed-wing aircraft are of the greatest interest to him. Entries on the site are in alphabetical order by country (including International) and then by manufacturer's name. In the cases of manufacturers producing a diversity of aircraft, those of obvious military potential are presented first. Today the site contains information on more than 500 aircraft and 3400 aircraft manufacturers.

For ease of access to information, entries on individual types of aircraft are subdivided under the following headings:

TYPE: A brief description of the aircraft's function.

PROGRAMME: A record of key events in an aircraft's production history. In the case of significant aircraft, which may have a long and detailed development phase, a short summary lists the key dates in that phase in an easily retrievable format.

CURRENT VERSIONS: Where applicable, details of available models (marks) and cross-reference to earlier versions now out of production.

CUSTOMERS: Present total on order and produced, often in tabular form, for military aircraft and those civil types for which such a list would not be of prohibitive length.

COSTS: Price per unit or programme price, plus any other disclosed information on R&D expenditure.

DESIGN FEATURES: Where appropriate, opens with a broad statement of design objectives and the means by which they were achieved. This is followed by details such as aerofoil section and helicopter rotor speeds.

FLYING CONTROLS: Here is described the method of controlling the aircraft, it being assumed that the reader has a basic understtnding of the function of ailerons, flaps, rudders, trim tabs and the other conventional manoeuvring surfaces. Descriptions are concerned with the method by which the controls are operated (manual/powered) and appropriate control inputs determined (autopilot/fly-by-wire, for example).

STRUCTURE: Configuration, materials and any special manufacturing methods; details of subcontractors or partners producing significant elements of the airframe.

LANDING GEAR: Includes tyre sizes and pressures for wheeled aircraft, as well as ground turning circle. Braking parachutes, where fitted.

POWER PLANT: Number and power of engines; helicopter transmission ratings; fuel capacity. Brief additional details are provided in the Aero-Engines listing.

ACCOMMODATION: Seating arrangements, access, environmental control and, for transport aircraft, cargo loading capacity; type of ejection seat, if fitted.

SYSTEMS: Power generation provisions, de-/anti-icing equipment, pressurisation/air conditioning and similar equipment

AVIONICS: The entry is subdivided into communications, radar, flight aids, instruments, mission equipment (mostly military or law-enforcement) and self-defence (military).

EQUIPMENT: Cargo-handling aids, spraying/firefighting apparatus, lighting, ballistic recovery parachutes and similar items.

ARMAMENT: Fixed and air-dropped/launched weapons listed by the manufacturer as actual or potential armament. Not all items may have been cleared for carriage and not all operators will use those which have.

DIMENSIONS, EXTERNAL: Includes door sizes and certain ground clearances.

DIMENSIONS, INTERNAL: Includes areas and volumes where relevant.

AREAS: Wings, fixed tail surfaces and control surfaces.

WEIGHTS AND LOADINGS: As supplied by the manufacturer, individual aircraft may vary.

PERFORMANCE: Observations as above; all speeds assumed TAS unless stated otherwise.

OPERATIONAL NOISE LEVELS: Internationally recognised measurements of landing and take-off sound at airports.